Is “Watching TV” becoming archaic language like “Dialing the phone”?

The English language can be slow sometimes  to give up on its catch phrases.  We sometimes talk about “dialing the phone” when most of us have not “dialed” a number with a rotary phone in decades.  In fact, there is a generation of young adults who may never have dialed a phone.  Sure they still know what the phrRotary Dial Phonease means, and they have seen rotary dial phones.  But, the phrase has long outlived the hardware involved.  

Will we be saying “Watching TV” for a long time?  I suspect that we will. But the hardware referred to as a TV will become a curious antique.  Your grandma might still have a TV in the next decade, and you may as well, but the phrase “watching TV” already means a broad range of video experiences on a broad range of devices that far outstrip the hardware currently called a television.

What is a “TV”?   Does anyone care about the device?

Why do the habits of language linger when the technology moves forward?